Paul Wouldn’t Let the Ephesians Forget They Were Gentiles

When Paul wrote Ephesians, he was writing to a church consisting of mostly Gentiles. Stephen E. Fowl, in his commentary on Ephesians[1], goes further, saying, “Indeed, it does not seem that the Ephesian Christians have much, if any, direct contact with Jewish Christians.” So Paul is writing in a context in which circumcision is not … Continue reading Paul Wouldn’t Let the Ephesians Forget They Were Gentiles

When God Say, “In Closing…” (The Rhetorical Language of Ephesians 1:10)

Ephesians 1:10 is the verse where the apostle Paul tells us what everything is all about. And everything means everything: “…making known to us the mystery of his will, according to his purpose, which he set forth in Christ as a plan for the fullness of time, to unite all things in him, things in … Continue reading When God Say, “In Closing…” (The Rhetorical Language of Ephesians 1:10)

The Grace of Prudence in Ephesians 1:8

The word "prudence" is fading from the English language. It's being replaced by other words. Normally, this kind of thing is fine. Words fall out of usage all the time. But biblically, in terms of translating from Greek to English, "prudence" does its job so well that we may not want to part with it—at least … Continue reading The Grace of Prudence in Ephesians 1:8

“Unworthy and Narrow Conceptions of Their Redeemer” – Charles Gore on the Connection Between Galatians and Ephesians

Paul's theology comes across differently in Ephesians and Colossians than it does in his earlier letters. The reason for this is that he was addressing different problems. Actually, he was addressing the same problem manifesting in two different ways. Charles Gore made this argument in 1897, in St. Paul's Epistle to the Ephesians A Practical Exposition. … Continue reading “Unworthy and Narrow Conceptions of Their Redeemer” – Charles Gore on the Connection Between Galatians and Ephesians

“The Apostle Is Too Full for Words” – T. Austin-Sparks on the Background of Ephesians

Does the letter of Ephesians mark a new stage of development in Paul's thought, or is it a fresh statement of the vision Paul had carried within himself, fully-developed, for many years? T. Austin-Sparks took the latter view. He shared it in a 1962 message titled "The Greatness of Christ." As Austin-Sparks told the story, … Continue reading “The Apostle Is Too Full for Words” – T. Austin-Sparks on the Background of Ephesians

“From a Historical to a Cosmical Significance”- James Denney on the Grand Vision of Ephesians and Colossians

In The Death of Christ (1902), James Denney examined everything the New Testament says about the theological significance of that death. Working through the letters of Paul, he was struck by the new perspective that appears in Colossians and Ephesians. As far as these two letters speak of the death of Christ, Denney saw in … Continue reading “From a Historical to a Cosmical Significance”- James Denney on the Grand Vision of Ephesians and Colossians

“Of Such a Second Paul Early Christian History Has No Knowledge”- F. F. Bruce on Who Wrote Ephesians

A lot of biblical scholars think Ephesians wasn't written by Paul, but by a student of his some time after his death. F. F. Bruce addressed this issue in his commentary on Ephesians (published in 1961). Bruce thought those scholars were giving Paul's students too much credit. If one of Paul's students wrote Ephesians, Bruce … Continue reading “Of Such a Second Paul Early Christian History Has No Knowledge”- F. F. Bruce on Who Wrote Ephesians